Luthuli Museum

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Wednesday, 12 May 2021
Monday, 17 October 2011 16:53

Oral History: Anne Kjelling & Ingrid Eide

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Oral history interview with Anne Kjelling & Ingrid Eide by Barbara Wahlberg.

Kjelling and Eide speak about Norway's occupation, the Norwegian campaign of passive resistance and how it affected the population's attitude to oppression in South Africa. Experience living in the USA during racial segregation is also offered as an explanation for sympathy with the anti-apartheid movement and both narrators give insights into the Civil Rights movement, focussing particularly on the role of students.

Students and the International Student Organisation are identified as sources of information on Apartheid South Africa for Norwegians during the Liberation Movement. Both narrators speak of their efforts to forge relationships with international students at that time, even if they did not sympathise with their communist affiliations.

The Indian situation and Ghandian principle of non-violence are also discussed with reference to Luthuli's own message of non-violence and his elucidation on this matter in his Nobel Lecture and acceptance speech. The issue of MK that arises from this topic is discussed more broadly as part of a global approach to conflict management. More specifically, the narrators and interviewer focus on Hans Beukes' story and the narrators' meetings with Luthuli and other family members. Finally discussed is the difficult matter of dealing with racism and segregation in a museum.

Additional Info

  • Object Name: Oral History
  • Object ID: LutMus2010.09.004
  • Creator: Luthuli Museum: Barbara Wahlberg
  • Date: 01-Oct-10
  • Description: Oral history interview with Anne Kjelling & Ingrid Eide by Barbara Wahlberg. Kjelling and Eide speak about Norway's occupation, the Norwegian campaign of passive resistance and how it affected the population's attitude to oppression in South Africa. Experience living in the USA during racial segregation is also offered as an explanation for sympathy with the anti-apartheid movement and both narrators give insights into the Civil Rights movement, focussing particularly on the role of students. Students and the International Student Organisation are identified as sources of information on Apartheid South Africa for Norwegians during the Liberation Movement. Both narrators speak of their efforts to forge relationships with international students at that time, even if they did not sympathise with their communist affiliations. The Indian situation and Ghandian principle of non-violence are also discussed with reference to Luthuli's own message of non-violence and his elucidation on this matter in his Nobel Lecture and acceptance speech. The issue of MK that arises from this topic is discussed more broadly as part of a global approach to conflict management. More specifically, the narrators and interviewer focus on Hans Beukes' story and the narrators' meetings with Luthuli and other family members. Finally discussed is the difficult matter of dealing with racism and segregation in a museum.
  • People: Kjelling, Anne; Eide, Ingrid; Luthuli, Chief Albert; Gandhi, Mohandas Karamchand, 'the Mahatma' ; Beukes, Hans; Wahlberg, Barbara; King, Martin Luther
Last modified on Tuesday, 25 October 2011 09:48
Administrator

Administrator

Laura Gibson currently manages the digitisation and collections management project at Luthuli Museum, Groutville, KwaZulu-Natal.

Website: www.luthulimuseum.org.za E-mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

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